Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh


This is quite possibly the funniest book I have ever read. So funny that I repeatedly had to set the book down, wipe my eyes, and take a deep breath to compose myself. So, so funny that I get a little giggle building up inside me even now, thinking about the part with the goose. And the part with the cake. Oh, and the part where they are lost in the woods. Seriously hysterical.

I couldn't even remember why I'd put the book on hold, or how I'd heard about it, but when I found it waiting for me on my desk at the library, I started flipping through it and knew I had a winner. How on earth I'd missed Allie Brosh's amazing blog, I have no idea. This book is made up of some of the best stories she's written, and even though most (all?) of it is probably available through her blog, this is one of the few books I will end up buying so I can have it. For me. Mine, mine, mine! (Picture Daffy Duck on the treasure pile in the cartoon with Aladdin's cave.)


Brosh has the rare gift of being able to remember childhood realistically - to remember how amazing and powerless and baffling childhood can be.  So that even when you are laughing you feel such compassion for the child she is writing about - and her parents, too, poor things. The drawings are deceptively childlike and simple, but as I read I found myself becoming more and more impressed by the skillful way she manages to infuse such emotion into the facial expressions and the posture of the characters.

Even though this is such a funny book, it also contains the most thoughtful and insightful portrayal I have ever read of what it is like to be acutely depressed. Anyone who has coped with depression will appreciate this aspect of the book. And anyone who has friends or loved ones who cope with depression (and that is just about everybody), should definitely read this book. And learn not to tell depressed people unhelpful
things like this:


I also adored the stories about her dogs. It makes me grin just thinking about them.


At first glance this seems like a silly and lighthearted book, which it certainly is, but there is more here than meets the eye, and I was delighted by the unexpected depth and the cleverness and compassion in Brosh's stories. There is definitely some adult language here, but I would still recommend this as an excellent crossover book for teens. In fact, both my children (now 13 and 15) read and loved it, and it sparked some thoughtful conversations that we wouldn't otherwise have had. Highly recommended!

Hyperbole and a Half: Unfortunate Situations, Flawed coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things That Happened by Allie Brosh (Touchstone, 2013)

2 comments:

  1. I agree, I haven't finished it yet, cuz I like to dip in every now and then and grin like an idiot. But it's also quite heartbreaking even in its funniest moments. it's crazy how those squiggly drawings can be so funny and so telling. And yeah, the stories about her dogs are great. I love stories about stupid dogs :P

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  2. I agree! It is amazing how a book can be so hysterical yet so poignant at the same time. And the drawings are unbelievably evocative!

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