Tuesday, November 25, 2014

The Different Girl by Gordon Dahlquist


Four teenage girls live on a tiny, isolated island. One is blonde, one brunette, one ginger, and one has black hair; but other than that, they are identical. Veronika, the redhead, narrates the story, telling how the girls' days are spent the same peaceful way, taking lessons from their teachers, two adults who are the only others who live on the island. They take walks around the island, carefully noticing the tiniest details about everything they encounter, talking with their teachers and among themselves until it is time for them to go to sleep - which entails the simple matter of their teacher pressing a button behind their ears.

Life passes in this way, full of sameness and predictability, until May, a girl who washes up on the beach following a shipwreck, appears in their lives. May has a lot of questions about the girls, the imperative for absolute secrecy that surrounds them, and she makes them think about things they have never before considered, first and foremost that their life on the island isn't as safe and peaceful as they have been led to believe.

This is a fascinating story, particularly in the way that it is told from Veronika's limited point of view. The reader only knows what Veronika sees and thinks, but there is so much more happening that it is necessary to draw inferences from Veronika's words and try to understand things that she cannot yet comprehend. It is an effective means of storytelling, but some readers my be a little frustrated at the end of the novel because there are so many unanswered questions - which would make this a good choice for a group read. There is a lot to talk about here.

I do not know if Dahlquist has plans for a sequel, but there is certainly a lot more of this story that could be told. I plan to include this book among my summer reading choices for next year, when I go to schools to book talk possible reading choices. It should appeal to fans of post-apocalyptic fiction as well as to those who enjoy a thoughtful character-driven story.

The Different Girl by Gordon Dahlquist (Dutton Books, 2013)

2 comments:

  1. I have never heard of this book before and it seems so interesting! I will see if my library has it!

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  2. I hadn't heard of it either - it just caught my eye at the library. I'd love to hear your thoughts on it! It's really an unusual YA novel.

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